The HH-60G Operational Loss Replacement Helicopter


HH-60G Pave Hawk Operational Loss Replacement Helicopter

The United States Air Force has recently introduced its most recent first fully built HH-60G Pave Hawk Operational Loss Replacement, or OLR, helicopter. This helicopter will be the first of 21 HH-60G aircrafts that the United States Air Force has added to their fleet in order to replace the aircrafts lost in roughly 15 years of deployed combat operations since 9/11.

The United States Air Force has converted 21 UH-60Ls by creating certain modifications in order to create 21 HH-60Gs with additionally installed equipment. These Operational Loss Replacement helicopters are equipped with a digital symbol generator, color weather radar, new radar warning receivers, improved tactical air navigation, a digital intercommunication system, as well as an automatic direction finder.

"The criteria we set for the helicopters we received was comprehensive and thorough,”

said Eric Fick, the United States Air Force global reach program director brigadier general.

"The result is the HH-60G OLR, a completely re-missionized helicopter that is fully capable of successfully executing the combat rescue mission."

The United States Air Force and the United Stated Army Aviation and Missile Command contracted Science and Engineering Services in order to modify the initial UH-60L aircrafts. After 2020, the United States Air Force will utilize the Operational Loss Replacement helicopters in order to conduct combat search and rescue (SAR) missions as well as to conduct personnel recovery until it starts operating as a modernized combat rescue helicopter.

After initial testing, the Air National Guard rescue units in Alaska, California, and New York will be receiving Operational Loss Replacement helicopters in the fiscal year of 2018. The Air National Guard units which will be receiving the Operational Loss Replacement aircrafts are the 210th Rescue Squadron at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska; the 129th RQS at Moffett Federal Airfield, California; as well as the 101st RQS at Gabreski Field, New York.


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